KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]


  • Paperback
  • 329
  • Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια
  • Aristotle
  • English
  • 06 October 2020
  • 9780140449495

Aristotle ã 3 read

Aristotle ã 3 read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια review ´ eBook or Kindle ePUB ‘One swallow does not make a summer; neither does one day Similarly neither can one day or a brief space of time make a man blessed and happy’In the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle sets out to examine the nature of happiness He argues that happiness consists in ‘activity of the soul in accordance with virtue’ for example with moral virtu I m a bit annoyed I wrote up my review to this last night and thought I d posted it but it seems to have gone to godnot happy about that amusingly enough This is my reconstruction of last night s reviewThere is a story that is almost certainly apocryphal about a French woman in the version I know this is Madame De Gaulle who is in England towards the end of her husband s career and is asked at some sort of official function what she wants most from life She answers a penis which unsurprisingly brings a near complete silence over the room something see seems completely confused by Charles De Gaulle then says to his wife I think they pronounce it appiness darling Aristotle is writing about how to live a good life pretty much what ethics means and his answer is that a good life is a happy life Well sort of Actually the Greek word that is translated as happiness here not unlike Madame De Gaulle s mis pronunciation doesn t necessarily mean what we would normally take happiness to mean Eudaimonia is made up of two words meaning good and soul but can also be translated as meaning human flourishing Now if you asked me how I was going and I said I m flourishing that doesn t necessarily mean I m happy It is not that the two ideas are a million miles apart but even Roget would be unlikely to slam them together in his little book of synonymsThis is a remarkably practical book not so much in that it tells you exactly how to behave at all times and in all circumstances it isn t practical in that sense but rather that it sets about giving you tools to help make a rational judgement about how you ought to behave given various circumstances It does this by discussing Aristotle s doctrine of the mean Aristotle says that every virtue falls between to extremes which are excesses of ualities that also go to make up that virtue So if you think of courage for example it falls between cowardice and foolhardiness In one case you have an exaggerated regard for your own life despite being seen as a coward and the likely humiliation that will bring and in the other you are too prepared to throw your life away and therefore not giving your life its proper value Now the point is that Aristotle isn t saying all that much here about how you might behave in a given situation but rather giving you guiding lines to watch out for his point is that if you are called upon to be brave there may be times when it is rational to behave in ways that might otherwise look foolhardy and at other times in ways that might look cowardly but a wise and happy person would do so on the basis of a rational assessment of where the mean lies given the time place and circumstance and knowing there are extremes you need to avoid is useful hereThere are bits of this that I found much annoying this time around than I did when I read it years ago 30 years ago now yuck how did that happen In fact I can t uite tell if Aristotle has become reactionary over the years or if I ve become progressive but it s one or the otherFor instance I found a lot of his discussions about women particularly annoying this time around Take this as a case in point from Book VIII Sometimes however women rule because they are heiresses their rule is thus not in accordance with virtue but due to wealth and power page 157 People will tell you that one of the problems with Aristotle and Plato is the fact that they could never conceive of a society in which there were no slaves but one of the advantages of Plato is that he did think women could and probably should be educated Aristotle clearly does not but the point I would really like to make is that he notices when women rule due to their wealth and power but not when men do the same Given so many men rule at all and so many of them rule due to the access their position gives them it seems an odd thing for someone like Aristotle not to noticeBecause this is uite a practical ethics he spends a lot of time talking about the sorts of things people ought to have in their lives to make them happy and this is why so much of the book is devoted to friendship I won t go over his arguments for the various types of friends one might have but do want to talk about love and lovers I think I could mount a case for saying that Aristotle is arguing against having a lover Not that he is advocating a life of celibacy or even of abstinence but rather that lovers come in what I like to think of as pairs after McCullers or Somerset Maugham who both said that there are lovers and the beloved and of the two everyone wants to be the lover rather than the beloved and that since being either the lover or a beloved is basically irrational given we fall in love by lightning strike as much as anything else it might stop just as uickly as it all started and then a lover who doesn t love any leaves a beloved who is no longer beloved not the basis for a lasting relationship The point being that friendship is based rationally on mutual benefits and mutual care if it was me I d pick the latter over the former friendship over love every time if these things allowed for choices like that that isNow I want to end by uoting a longer bit from Book X page 200 Some think we become good by nature some by habit and others by teaching Nature s contribution is clearly not in our power but it can be found in those who are truly fortunate as the result of some divine dispensation Argument and teaching presumably are not powerful in every case but the soul of the student must be prepared beforehand in its habits with a view to its enjoying and hating in a noble way like soil that is to nourish seed For if someone were to live by his feelings he would not listen to an argument to dissuade him nor could he even understand it How can we persuade a person in a state like this to change his ways And in general feelings seem to yield not to argument but to force There must therefore somehow be a pre existing character with some affinity for virtue through its fondness for what is noble and dislike of what is disgraceful But if one has not been reared under the right laws it is difficult to obtain from one s earliest years the correct upbringing for virtue because the masses especially the young do not find it pleasant to live temperately and with endurance For this reason their upbringing and pursuits should be regulated by laws because they will not find them painful once they have become accustomed to them I find this really interesting for a whole range of reasons Okay so he starts off by saying that nature is the main thing to ensure that one is capable of learning but it is interesting that this alone is not enough Nature is essential but left on its own will not get you very far The other is teaching but teaching too may not help unless you have been prepared to hear the lesson something Gramsci talks about at some length saying working class children need to be given discipline that they are unfamiliar with if they are to have any hope of succeeding in education What is stressed here is the development of habits and dispositions and that these are what allows the other two nature and teaching to be given any chance of successAristotle is keen to stress that he is talking about virtues but again the Greek word here ar te doesn t just mean morally good behaviours but rather something closer to the excellences that we associate with different kinds of behaviours so that a fisherman has virtues too not in the sense of being morally upright but rather at knowing what is good for a fisherman to do and be A lot of this reminded me of Pascal s Pens es There is a bit in that where Pascal says that happiness really isn t related to the outcome but to the process That is that you won t make a hunter happy by giving him a couple of rabbits at the start of the day and saying to him now you don t have to go out hunting today relax enjoy yourself Rather even a mangy rabbit caught through the effort of the hunt will be worth to the hunter than a dozen plump ones handed over without effort at the start of the day Not always true of course but I m exaggerating to make the point In a lot of ways that is Aristotle s ethics find out what you are meant to do and do that as best you can and that will make you happy or good souled or flourishing one of those Demon, Volume 3 review to this last night and thought I d posted it but it seems to have gone to godnot happy about that amusingly enough This is my You Wouldn't Want to Be an Assyrian Soldier!: An Ancient Army You'd Rather Not Join (You Wouldn't Want to...) reconstruction of last night s Herdentiere reviewThere is a story that is almost certainly apocryphal about a French woman in the version I know this is Madame De Gaulle who is in England towards the end of her husband s career and is asked at some sort of official function what she wants most from life She answers a penis which unsurprisingly brings a near complete silence over the Thought Bubble Anthology Collection 10 Years of Comics room something see seems completely confused by Charles De Gaulle then says to his wife I think they pronounce it appiness darling Aristotle is writing about how to live a good life pretty much what ethics means and his answer is that a good life is a happy life Well sort of Actually the Greek word that is translated as happiness here not unlike Madame De Gaulle s mis pronunciation doesn t necessarily mean what we would normally take happiness to mean Eudaimonia is made up of two words meaning good and soul but can also be translated as meaning human flourishing Now if you asked me how I was going and I said I m flourishing that doesn t necessarily mean I m happy It is not that the two ideas are a million miles apart but even Roget would be unlikely to slam them together in his little book of synonymsThis is a The Mysterious Murder of JFKs Mistress remarkably practical book not so much in that it tells you exactly how to behave at all times and in all circumstances it isn t practical in that sense but Lisa Emmer Historical Thrillers Vol. 1-2 rather that it sets about giving you tools to help make a Star Crossed Battered Hearts Book 2 rational judgement about how you ought to behave given various circumstances It does this by discussing Aristotle s doctrine of the mean Aristotle says that every virtue falls between to extremes which are excesses of ualities that also go to make up that virtue So if you think of courage for example it falls between cowardice and foolhardiness In one case you have an exaggerated Batman Forever regard for your own life despite being seen as a coward and the likely humiliation that will bring and in the other you are too prepared to throw your life away and therefore not giving your life its proper value Now the point is that Aristotle isn t saying all that much here about how you might behave in a given situation but Mapping the Interior rather giving you guiding lines to watch out for his point is that if you are called upon to be brave there may be times when it is States of Injury rational to behave in ways that might otherwise look foolhardy and at other times in ways that might look cowardly but a wise and happy person would do so on the basis of a The behaviour of moths rational assessment of where the mean lies given the time place and circumstance and knowing there are extremes you need to avoid is useful hereThere are bits of this that I found much annoying this time around than I did when I Regulating Aversion Tolerance in the Age of Identity and Empire read it years ago 30 years ago now yuck how did that happen In fact I can t uite tell if Aristotle has become Politics Out of History reactionary over the years or if I ve become progressive but it s one or the otherFor instance I found a lot of his discussions about women particularly annoying this time around Take this as a case in point from Book VIII Sometimes however women Edgework Critical Essays on Knowledge and Politics rule because they are heiresses their The Standard Grand rule is thus not in accordance with virtue but due to wealth and power page 157 People will tell you that one of the problems with Aristotle and Plato is the fact that they could never conceive of a society in which there were no slaves but one of the advantages of Plato is that he did think women could and probably should be educated Aristotle clearly does not but the point I would The Signal Flame really like to make is that he notices when women ترانه های بابا طاهر (گزینه ادب پارسی #11) rule due to their wealth and power but not when men do the same Given so many men Spelling the Hours Stone Bird Poetry #1 rule at all and so many of them The Brontë Sisters rule due to the access their position gives them it seems an odd thing for someone like Aristotle not to noticeBecause this is uite a practical ethics he spends a lot of time talking about the sorts of things people ought to have in their lives to make them happy and this is why so much of the book is devoted to friendship I won t go over his arguments for the various types of friends one might have but do want to talk about love and lovers I think I could mount a case for saying that Aristotle is arguing against having a lover Not that he is advocating a life of celibacy or even of abstinence but More Than I Wished For rather that lovers come in what I like to think of as pairs after McCullers or Somerset Maugham who both said that there are lovers and the beloved and of the two everyone wants to be the lover Gary Players Black Book rather than the beloved and that since being either the lover or a beloved is basically irrational given we fall in love by lightning strike as much as anything else it might stop just as uickly as it all started and then a lover who doesn t love any leaves a beloved who is no longer beloved not the basis for a lasting Entropy in Bloom relationship The point being that friendship is based A Fine Red Rain rationally on mutual benefits and mutual care if it was me I d pick the latter over the former friendship over love every time if these things allowed for choices like that that isNow I want to end by uoting a longer bit from Book X page 200 Some think we become good by nature some by habit and others by teaching Nature s contribution is clearly not in our power but it can be found in those who are truly fortunate as the The Dance of the Violin result of some divine dispensation Argument and teaching presumably are not powerful in every case but the soul of the student must be prepared beforehand in its habits with a view to its enjoying and hating in a noble way like soil that is to nourish seed For if someone were to live by his feelings he would not listen to an argument to dissuade him nor could he even understand it How can we persuade a person in a state like this to change his ways And in general feelings seem to yield not to argument but to force There must therefore somehow be a pre existing character with some affinity for virtue through its fondness for what is noble and dislike of what is disgraceful But if one has not been Elementary She Read A Sherlock Holmes Bookshop Mystery #1 reared under the Red Chameleon right laws it is difficult to obtain from one s earliest years the correct upbringing for virtue because the masses especially the young do not find it pleasant to live temperately and with endurance For this Indoor Cats (Complete Pet Owner's Manual) reason their upbringing and pursuits should be Diary of a South Beach Party Girl regulated by laws because they will not find them painful once they have become accustomed to them I find this Bibliography and Index of English Verse 1559 1603 really interesting for a whole Beyond the Ladies' Lounge Australian Women Publicans range of Terrible Times (Eddie Dickens Trilogy Book 3) reasons Okay so he starts off by saying that nature is the main thing to ensure that one is capable of learning but it is interesting that this alone is not enough Nature is essential but left on its own will not get you very far The other is teaching but teaching too may not help unless you have been prepared to hear the lesson something Gramsci talks about at some length saying working class children need to be given discipline that they are unfamiliar with if they are to have any hope of succeeding in education What is stressed here is the development of habits and dispositions and that these are what allows the other two nature and teaching to be given any chance of successAristotle is keen to stress that he is talking about virtues but again the Greek word here ar te doesn t just mean morally good behaviours but The Greatest Gift rather something closer to the excellences that we associate with different kinds of behaviours so that a fisherman has virtues too not in the sense of being morally upright but Meet My Famous Friends rather at knowing what is good for a fisherman to do and be A lot of this Any Given Doomsday reminded me of Pascal s Pens es There is a bit in that where Pascal says that happiness Mantula really isn t A Month of Mondays related to the outcome but to the process That is that you won t make a hunter happy by giving him a couple of Rural Poverty in Paraguay rabbits at the start of the day and saying to him now you don t have to go out hunting today Lord Change Me relax enjoy yourself Rather even a mangy Kant in 90 Minutes Philosophers in 90 Minutes rabbit caught through the effort of the hunt will be worth to the hunter than a dozen plump ones handed over without effort at the start of the day Not always true of course but I m exaggerating to make the point In a lot of ways that is Aristotle s ethics find out what you are meant to do and do that as best you can and that will make you happy or good souled or flourishing one of those

free download Æ eBook or Kindle ePUB ã Aristotle

Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια

Aristotle ã 3 read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια review ´ eBook or Kindle ePUB Es such as courage generosity and justice and intellectual virtues such as knowledge wisdom and insight The Ethics also discusses the nature of practical reasoning the value and the objects of pleasure the different forms of friendship and the relationship between individual virtue society and the State Aristotle’s work has had a profound a This re read was perhaps a slight bit superfluous I remembered reading it way back in high school on my own just because I was that kind of geekGet the foundations read kid Know what the whole line of thought is all about Use it later to trounce your fellow debaters Yeah whatever Logic and an examined life have since then been of an end rather than a meansCase in point This is about examining Happiness It does so in a fairly exhaustive but not exhausting way Aristotle just lays down the foundations brings up the various opinions people usually hold about WHAT happiness entails and then tries to pare away the flawed answersUsually a normal adventure tale is never about the end destination End destinations are usually a let down The effort to get there is usually a lot satisfyingSame for Aristotle It turns out I remembered the first journey perfectly And it brought me happiness

read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια

Aristotle ã 3 read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια review ´ eBook or Kindle ePUB Nd lasting influence on all subseuent Western thought about ethical mattersJ A K Thomson’s translation has been revised by Hugh Tredennick and is accompanied by a new introduction by Jonathan Barnes This edition also includes an updated list for further reading and a new chronology of Aristotle’s life and worksPreviously published as Ethi The Nicomachean Ethics is one of the greatest works of Aristotle the famous philosopher who was really much of a scientist than a philosopher This is the book where he indulges in the discussion of happiness virtue ethics politics and really anything else describing the way in which human beings functioned together in the society of a Greek city state of early AntiuityEspecially in the field of politics this work excels and Aristotle puts forth a particularly interesting theory on the forms of government According to him there are really only three different forms of government but each of them comes with a corresponding corrupt deviation The finest form of government he says is the monarchy the rule of one But its corresponding deviation which is tyranny is the worst form of government and the line between the two is thin and sinuous Likewise the second finest form of government is the aristocracy the rule of the best And aristocracy in its corrupted form is oligarchy the second worst form of government Lastly the third finest form of government is timocracy the rule of property owners which was strikingly similar to the political system already existing in Aristotle s Athens But the corrupt form of timocracy he says is democracy a system in which society has deviated into a constant suabble where everyone seeks to advance their own interests rather than the interests of the state The conclusion seems to be that as long as long as the rulers of the state are just and competent it is better the fewer they are But if the rulers are unjust and incompetent the opposite is true To those as interested in political theory as I am I would recommend just reading Book VIII and skipping all the restThe most interesting thing about the book however is that the writing is absolutely terrible Not the language mind you but the style in which the book is written What is truly incredible is that the writing here is exactly how an average academic writer today would write his or her books On one hand that made this book ridiculously boring to read On the other it was really interesting because it proves how much modern academics owe to the legacy of Aristotle And that they should find another source of inspiration since for instance Plato was a far better writer than his most famous pupilI would recommend this book only to those particularly interested in philosophical political and ethical theory and even then I would suggest just opening the book and reading the parts that sound interesting to you instead of attempting the dreary business of reading it as a whole


10 thoughts on “KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]

  1. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια

    read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια Aristotle ã 3 read KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] The Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle The Nicomachean Ethics is the name normally given to Aristotle's best known work on ethics The work which plays a pre eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics consists of ten books originally separate scrolls and is understood to be based on notes from his lectures at the Lyceum The title is often assumed to refer to his son Nicomachus to whom the work was dedicated or who m

  2. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]

    KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] free download Æ eBook or Kindle ePUB ã Aristotle Aristotle ã 3 read Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle postulates the highest human good is eudaimonia or what is loosely translated into Engli

  3. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]

    free download Æ eBook or Kindle ePUB ã Aristotle Aristotle ã 3 read read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια I’m a bit annoyed – I wrote up my review to this last night and thought I’d posted it but it seems to have gone to godnot happy about that amusingly enough This is my reconstruction of last night’s reviewThere is a story that is almost certainly apocryphal about a French woman in the version I know this is Madame De Gaulle who is in England towards the end of her husband’s career and is asked at some sort of official

  4. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] free download Æ eBook or Kindle ePUB ã Aristotle Aristotle ã 3 read

    KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] When I was young I had an idée fixe an obsessionOh it’s easy to be like that if you were brought up in 1950’s Mainstream Christianity or later if like Cherilyn’s Dad in the amazing new Chasing Eden you were influenced at some point or another by a fundamentalist splinter group Then you might have had the idée fixe of a retributive God a PUNISHING GodAnd though my choice was always mainstream theology when my life went into a tail

  5. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]

    KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] This re read was perhaps a slight bit superfluous I remembered reading it way back in high school on my own just because I was that kind of geekGet the foundations read kid Know what the whole line of thought is all about Use it late

  6. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]

    Aristotle ã 3 read free download Æ eBook or Kindle ePUB ã Aristotle read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια Happiness is the activity of a rational soul in accordance with virtue writes Aristotle in the Nicomachean Ethics Activity means living Rational soul means a human being And virtue means human excellence So happiness means a human living excellently How does one live excellently One learns to be good at the things that are human and these ar

  7. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]

    read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] Aristotle ã 3 read The Nicomachean Ethics is one of the greatest works of Aristotle the famous philosopher who was really much of a scientist than a philosopher This is the book where he indulges in the discussion of happiness virtue ethics politics and really anything else describing the way in which human beings functioned togeth

  8. says: KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια]

    read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] Aristotle ã 3 read Aristotle doesn't satisfy your whole soul just the logical side but here he is uite thorough The Nicomachean Ethics is his most important study of personal morality and the ends of human life He does little than search for and examine the good He examines the virtue and vices of man in all his faculties He beli

  9. says: read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] Aristotle ã 3 read

    KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] November 20 2019 5 starsAiiiiiii look at me re reading books in the same year Definitely did not expect to be go back to this one so soon but glad I did Context does amazing things for your understanding Read this one as part of class instead of just 'cause and gained so much out of it January 31st 2019 Review

  10. says: free download Æ eBook or Kindle ePUB ã Aristotle Aristotle ã 3 read read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια

    read Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια KINDLE [Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια] Aristotle ã 3 read This is a book worth rereading every few years It is actually lecture notes by one of Aristotle’s students as are most of the extant writings attributed to Aristotle Not a work to be rushed through the Ethics reuires concentration and pond

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *