(E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo


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  • Nord invisible
  • Alexandra Shimo
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  • 23 July 2020
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Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read

review Nord invisible Nord invisible Summary º 8 Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read Part history of the Canadian reserves Shimo offers an expansive exploration and unorthodox take on many of the First Nation issues that dominate the news today including the suicide crises murdered and missing indigenous women and girls Treaty rights First Nations sovereignty and deep povert. Probably the best and hardest book I read all year Invisible North The Search For Answers on a Troubled Reserve makes you understand way about the unfairness of Indian Act and the struggles of indigenous people in Canada

Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo

Nord invisible

review Nord invisible Nord invisible Summary º 8 Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read A vivid first person account of life on a troubled reserve that illuminates a difficult and oft ignored historyWhen freelance journalist Alexandra Shimo arrives in Kashechewan a fly in northern Ontario reserve to investigate rumours of a fabricated water crisis and document its deplorable liv. One of the most eye opening books I ve ever readThis book is part of my Truth and Reconciliation reading and I picked it up one evening because I figured a memoir would be relatively easy bedtime reading in terms of language if not content That assessment turned out to be correct it s a short book written in a very readable style blending an account of Shimo s months on a northern Ontario reserve with background about the history of the reserves and the treatment of Indigenous people by the Canadian government The copyediting sometimes leaves something to be desired but I can forgive that because the content is so powerfulI was constantly shocked by some new revelation about how the government s actions There s just so much disturbing policy that led to the terrible living conditions of Indigenous Canadians on reserves Until the very recent past people living on reserves weren t even allowed to visit other reserves without permission from the government of Canada They weren t aren t allowed to trade with each other They re forced to buy from one government store that can use its monopoly to charge obscene prices EtcThen there s the Sixties Scoop a government policy of kidnapping Indigenous children from their families and giving them up for adoption to non Indigenous families They would claim that they were taking the child to see a doctor and the child just wouldn t come back The policy was supposed to be for neglectedabused children but they assumed all children on reserves were neglectedabusedAnd there were the anti trade sections of the Indian Act which banned Aboriginals from doing business with each other unless the transaction was approved by the Ministry laws that were only revoked in December 2014 In general the reserve isn t allowed to do anything without permission from the government and the government pretty much always says noThe account as a whole is chillingly dystopian All money is controlled by the Ministry which gives or often doesn t give funding according to its whims with no explanation or accountability The result is that people are afraid even to talk to a journalist about their terrible living conditions because angering the Ministry could result in the withholding of money that they need to surviveI don t know what s shocking the horrible laws that forced Indigenous people into poverty or the fact that I had literally no idea I grew up reading multiple Canadian newspapers daily and I had no ideaShimo has an explanation for that too The main theory used to explain these conditions is that they are the unfortunate remnant of policies that we now acknowledge as a historic mistake As a national myth so oft repeated it has gained the familiarity of a nursery rhyme it has the advantage that any wrongdoing is embedded firmly in the past This definitely rings true to me I remember being taught very briefly about the residential school system and coming away with the impression that it was just one of those unenlightened things that nineteenth century people did I don t think I learned until a couple of years ago that it had continued into the 1990sAnyway I could uote and passages but I ll limit myself to one final extended uote about how the reserves came to be where they are todayAnd it was easy to continue moving First Nations persons around as if they were unwanted bedroom furniture long past the era of Herbert Spencer s Survival of the Fittest and nineteenth century colonial expansion This is where Canadian history differs from that of other developed countries such as the United States and New Zealand which also committed mass displacement of their indigenous people but mostly stopped after the nineteenth centuryIn 1956 the Ministry decided that the Sayisi Dene were not getting enough to eat and therefore needed to be moved In fact they were but the department had miscounted the number of caribou in the herds The spot chosen just outside of Churchill Manitoba named Camp 10 was a rocky windy outcrop measuring three hundred by six hundred feet devoid of any trees sanitation or fresh water and accessible only by foot Children found food by scavenging in the local dump Dumpster diving was seen as necessary but highly dangerous as Camp 10 was located in the polar bear migration path Within five years an estimated one third of the original Sayisi Dene population had died from disease and malnutritionOr there s the Mushuau Innu Without consultation they were loaded onto boats and transported two hundred kilometres to a location lacking trees and hunting It too was located on a rocky outcrop without running water It was believed that the Innu would simply shift from hunting caribou to becoming full time fishermen not because they had any desire or proclivities for their new profession but because the new site was not too far from fishing grounds The rock was considered too expensive to dig so houses were built without sewage systems Waste and garbage began to accumulateAnd it just goes on I d say this is essential reading for any Canadian because it manages to convey a powerful and important message wrapped up in a short and easy to read memoir Shimo s original purpose was to investigate a water crisis that was possibly exaggerated for media attention but the book goes so far beyond that that the main goal sometimes seems like a distraction from the real story Whenever I started to think that that was enough about the machinations surrounding the water crisis Shimo would move on to something important like the children s suicide crisisAnyway it s not a perfect book but it s extremely eye opening and highly recommended

review Nord invisible

review Nord invisible Nord invisible Summary º 8 Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read Ing conditions she finds herself drawn into the troubles of the reserve Unable to cope with the desperate conditions she begins to fall apartA moving tribute to the power of hope and resilience Invisible North is an intimate portrait of a place that pushes everyone to their limits Part memoir. I am asked to write an extensive review A summary will appear here later Overall an important depressing challenging read on the ongoing devastating conditions in northern remote First Nations reserves Hope is always just over the horizon promises are made and change can t come soon enough


10 thoughts on “(E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo

  1. says: review Nord invisible (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo

    (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Right now there is a debate about books in Canada called Canada Reads The theme this year and has been in different variations of the same theme in the last few years is What is the One Book Canada Should Read Now? Invisible North is not in the running this year and it's a shame This is definitely one book every Canadian should read now Conce

  2. says: Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo

    review Nord invisible (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo Bravo Alexandra Shimo for your profoundly personal painful and powerful insights you shared in this book of a trip to the Kashechewan reserve in Northern Ontario to uncover the truth behind a water crisis What the author found in addition to an interesting water crisis story were deplorable living conditions st

  3. says: review Nord invisible Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo

    (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo One of the most eye opening books I've ever readThis book is part of my Truth and Reconciliation reading and I picked it up one evening because I figured a memoir would be relatively easy bedtime reading in terms of langu

  4. says: review Nord invisible (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read

    Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo I am asked to write an extensive review A summary will appear here later Overall an important depressing challenging read on the ongoing devastating conditions in northern remote First Nations reserves Hope is always just over the horizon promises are made and change can't come soon enough

  5. says: (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo review Nord invisible

    (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read Every country has its dirty little secrets and Invisible North tells of Canada's modern day mistreatment and neglect of the native Indians in Kashechewan First Nation Source material comes from the author's personal experience on the reservation and from research The subject matter is very bleak but I would recommend this book or s

  6. says: review Nord invisible (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read

    (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Invisible North is a true 55 star accomplishment and a trip that was emotionally charged on a number of levels Writing a truly objective review proved to be tougher than expected for during its last couple of chapters my heart was pounding I w

  7. says: (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo

    (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo I am giving this book 5 stars because for a short concise read this book provided vital information and understandable context that every Canadian should have to understand the tragedy of life on reserves In my ignorance of the political and social reasons for indigenous peoples entrapment in reserve life I never knew the right uestions to ask to understand better and frankly the uestions I wanted to ask seemed so obv

  8. says: Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo

    review Nord invisible (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo Probably the best and hardest book I read all year Invisible North The Search For Answers on a Troubled Reserve makes you understand way about the unfairness of Indian Act and the struggles of indigenous people in Canada

  9. says: Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo

    (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read review Nord invisible Journalist Alexandra Shimo goes north into the remote Northern Ontario reserve of the Kashechewan she plans to write about a water crisis that broke out on the reserve in 2005 She discovers instead the depressing c

  10. says: (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read

    Summary ´ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Alexandra Shimo Alexandra Shimo ✓ 8 Free read (E–pub) Nord invisible by Alexandra Shimo I am privileged I know this Sometimes it's good to have a reminder and this book certainly gave me one It amazes me that people have to live this way in Canada I'm ashamed that we have people living in third world conditions or fourth world conditions First Nation communities are being called I have to wonder if we would grow to hav

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